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DUBAI METRO (AL QUSAIS) GREEN LINE No. 12

DUBAI METRO (AL QUSAIS STATION) GREEN LINE No. 12.  PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (AL QUSAIS STATION) GREEN LINE No. 12. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (AL QUSAIS STATION) GREEN LINE No. 12. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (AL QUSAIS STATION) GREEN LINE No. 12. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (AL QUSAIS STATION) GREEN LINE No. 12. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (AL QUSAIS STATION) GREEN LINE No. 12. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (AL QUSAIS STATION) GREEN LINE No. 12. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (AL QUSAIS STATION) GREEN LINE No. 12. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (AL QUSAIS STATION) GREEN LINE No. 12. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (ETISALAT STATION) GREEN LINE

DUBAI METRO (ETISALAT STATION) GREEN LINE

DUBAI METRO (ETISALAT STATION) GREEN LINE No. 11. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (ETISALAT STATION) GREEN LINE No. 11. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (ETISALAT STATION) GREEN LINE No. 11. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (ETISALAT STATION) GREEN LINE No. 11. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (ETISALAT STATION) GREEN LINE No. 11. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (ETISALAT STATION) GREEN LINE No. 11. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (ETISALAT STATION) GREEN LINE No. 11. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (ETISALAT STATION) GREEN LINE No. 11. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (ETISALAT STATION) GREEN LINE No. 11. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (ETISALAT STATION) GREEN LINE No. 11. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (ETISALAT STATION) GREEN LINE No. 11. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (ETISALAT STATION) GREEN LINE No. 11. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (ETISALAT STATION) GREEN LINE No. 11. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

DUBAI METRO (ETISALAT STATION) GREEN LINE No. 11. PHOTO:OYESAN.DINO.MAGKASI

7-STAR HOTEL BURJ AL ARAB, DUBAI, UAE

7-STAR HOTEL, BURJ AL ARAB, DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES. OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

7-STAR HOTEL, BURJ AL ARAB, DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES. OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

7-STAR HOTEL, BURJ AL ARAB, DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES. OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

 

BURJ KHALIFA WORLD’S TALLEST BUILDING PHOTOS

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASIWORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

WORLD'S TALLEST BUILDING BURJ KHALIFA DUBAI UAE. PHOTO:OYE.DINO.MAGKASI

 

TAIO CRUZ YOUTUBE CHANNEL

Taio Cruz (born Jacob Taio Cruz on April 23, 1983) is a British  singer-songwriterrecord producer, occasional rapper, and entrepreneur. In 2008, he released his debut album Departure, which Cruz wrote, arranged and produced himself. It achieved initial success in the UK and earned him a MOBO Award nomination. In June 2010, Cruz released his follow-up album Rokstarr, which includes the number one singles “Break Your Heart” and “Dynamite“. In November 2010, Cruz collaborated with Kylie Minogue and Travie McCoy on his single “Higher“. Additionally, Cruz penned and recorded the song “Telling the World” as the lead single from the soundtrack to the 2011 animated film Rio.

Cruz was born in London, to a Nigerian father and a Brazilian mother. He attended Christ’s Hospital, a boarding school in West Sussex.


Taio Cruz – Dynamite (Int’l Version)

Cruz began writing songs when he was 12. His songwriting career began at age 19 as part ofTricky Stewart‘s writing collective, RedZone Entertainment. Cruz achieved notability in 2005 when he was awarded a BRIT Award for co-writing Will Young‘s 2004 single, “Your Game“.

Taio Cruz – Break Your Heart ft. Ludacris


Cruz is the founder and chief executive of Rokstarr Music London, which in 2006 released his debut single “I Just Wanna Know“. The single attracted significant attention from radio, and also from music industry insiders, who were already well aware of the artist’s potential; manager Jamie Binns, who began representing Cruz at this time, later told HitQuarters: “He was a guy that everyone had earmarked to do damage in the future.” Although the single received a reasonable amount of radio airplay, it did not perform as well as expected in either territory. However, rather than lose faith in Cruz, the labels were eager to negotiate an album deal, as by this time they had listened to his other songs and were ever more convinced by his capability.

Taio Cruz – I Just Wanna Know

Cruz’s admirers included Island Records‘s Darcus Beese and Universal Republic‘s Monte Lipman, whom, according to Binns: “Both believed ‘I Just Wanna Know’ fitted the format on both sides of the Atlantic.” In 2006, Cruz signed a split single deal with Universal Music Groupcompanies, Republic Records and the UK branch of Island Records.

Come On Girl (Live At Radio 1’s Big Weekend, 2011)


Taio Cruz released his second single “Moving On” in September 2007 which made the top 30 in the UK. In March 2008 his next single, “Come On Girl,” featuring Luciana, peaked at No. 5 on the UK charts. The related album Departure appeared on 17 March and peaked at No. 17. This was followed by the single “I Can Be,” which reached No. 18 in May. On 18 August, “She’s Like a Star” was released, which was a remix of the previous single and featured American rapper Busta Rhymes and girl-group Sugababes. The remix later appeared on the Sugababes studio album Catfights & Spotlights, which peaked at No. 20. It was later revealed that Cruz narrowly missed out on the chance to record the song “Umbrella” which was eventually recorded by Rihanna and ended up topping charts around the world. thanks to  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taio_CruZ

Dirty Picture (Live At Radio 1’s Big Weekend, 2011)

Taio Cruz – Higher (Live At Radio 1’s Big Weekend, 2011)

  

Taio Cruz – Dynamite (Live At Radio 1’s Big Weekend, 2011)

Falling In Love (Live At Radio 1’s Big Weekend, 2011)

Forever Love (Live At Radio 1’s Big Weekend, 2011)

Telling the World (From the Soundtrack to “RIO” the Movie)



OYESAN DINO MAGKASI

Al Muraqqabat Road

Al Muraqqabat, sometimes spelled Al Muraqabat, is a locality in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE). Located in the heart of eastern Dubai in Deira, Al Muraqqabat is bordered by the localities of Al Rigga, Al Muteena and Al Khabisi.

Although a predominantly residential area, Al Muraqqabat also has many shopping malls, hotels and restaurants. As a residential area, Al Muraqqabat has the third-highest population density in the city of Dubai (after Ayil Nasir andNaif) [1]. The locality is bounded to the north by route D 88 (Omar bin Khattab Road) and to the south by route E 11 (Abu Baker Al Siddique Road). Al Muraqqabat Road divides the locality into two sub-sections, the western flank of which is primarily residential, while the eastern flank is more commercial, with banks, hotels and restaurants located in it.

Fish Roundabout, located at the northwestern periphery of Al Muraqqabat is an important landmark in Deira. Additionally, other landmarks in the locality include Al Ghurair City, Hamarain Centre, Warba Centre, JW Marriott, Al Muraqqabat Police Station, the head offices of Mashreq Bank and Al Futtaim, Marks & Spencer and Toys ‘R’ Us.

Like many parts of Deira, Al Muraqqabat is a primarily South Asian community. The locality follows a grid plan, with even-numbered streets running northwest-southeast through the locality, starting with 2nd Street, near route D 80 (Salahuddin Road) and ending with 30 Road (Al Rigga Road). Odd numbered streets run perpendicular to even-numbered streets in a southwest-northeast direction, beginning with 1st Street in the northern periphery of the locality (near Fish Roundabout), and ending with 45th Street (near Hamarain Centre and route D 78). Al Rigga is a twin locality of Al Muraqqabat as the grid system of local roads from Al Muraqqabat continues to progress into Al Rigga. Both Al Muraqqabat and Al Rigga are important centres of entertainment and shopping during the Dubai Shopping Festival (DSF). Al Rigga Road, which separates Al Rigga from Al Muraqqabat, typically hosts Planet Pepsi, an entertainment park, during DSF.

PHOTOS : OYESAN DINO MAGKASI

Al Fahidhi Fort in Burdubai, Dubai, UAE. a historical fort!

Al Fahidhi Road, Burdubai, Dubai, UAE. Photo:Oyesan Magkasi

Al Fahidhi Road in Burdubai was named after Al Fahidhi Fort. It was built in several phases. The oldest tower was built around 1787 and believed to be the oldest building in Dubai that still exists today. The fort was used to guard the landward approaches to the town from the raids of neighbouring tribes. It has also served, at various times throughout history as the ruler’s palace, a garrison, and a prison.

Al Fahidhi Road, Burdubai, Dubai, UAE. Photo:Oyesan Magkasi

In 1969 Sheikh Hamdan Bin Rashid Al Maktoum issued a letter to Sheikh Badr Mohammad Al Sabah, head of the office of state in Kuwait, asking for a museum expert to be sent to Dubai to help establish the museum. Work on renovating the fort commenced in 1970, and opened as the Dubai Museum on 12 May 1971 by Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum, then ruler of Dubai. Additional galleries were built and opened in 1995.

Al Fahidhi Road, Burdubai, Dubai, UAE. Photo:Oyesan Magkasi

Now Al Fahidhi Road is a commercial hub parallel to Dubai Creek. You can find gold shops, hotels, thrift stores, shawarma stands, foreign exchange shops and electronic retail outlets.  It has become one of the shopping favorites by tourists, locals, and expatriates. During night time, the area is so vibrant and you can feel that the city is alive.

Many multi nationality expat workers are staying in the area, but the area is predominantly occupied by Indians, Pakistanis, Nepalis, Bangladeshis, Sri Lankans, Filipinos and Arabs from Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria, Jordan, Oman, Yemen, Egypt, and Morocco.

Just a minute walk, you can find the abra station, ferrying people from Burdubai side to Deira via Dubai Creek and it will only cost you 1 dirham per ride. Along with it are the beautiful dhows sailing through the creek offering cruise with live music, food and entertainment plus the bonus of watching the stunning skyline of mesmerizing Dubai at night.

Al Fahidhi Road runs from  Al Mussallah intersection or (Al Fahidhi Roundabout)  to Al Ghubaibah Bus Station. (Oyesan Magkasi)

 

Dubai Dhow – Like Gala as a Swaying Swan!

A term, probably of Swahili origin, referring to several types of sailing vessels (many now outfitted with motors) common to the Gulf Arab states.

Arabs refer to dhows by names specific to each type, determined principally by size and hull design. Four kinds of dhows account for most of these vessels.

The sambuk (or sambook), perhaps the most widely represented, is a graceful craft with a tapered bow and a high, squared stern; it was often used for pearling, and today is used for fishing and commerce. A larger vessel, the boom, is still common in the Gulf. It ranges from 50 to 120 feet (15 – 35 m) in length, 15 to 30 (5 – 9 m) feet in width, and up to 400 tons (363 metric tons) displacement. Like early Arab ships it is double-ended (pointed at both ends) with a straight stem post. It is important in Gulf commerce. Now rare is another large ship, thebaggala, formerly an important deep-sea vessel. Sometimes over 300 tons (272 metric tons) and with a crew of 150, it was built with a high, squared poop, reflecting the influence of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Portuguese vessels. Like the sambuk and baggala, it has two masts. The jalboot, a single-masted vessel and much smaller (20 – 50 tons [18 – 45 metric tons]), formerly was widely used on the pearling banks of the Gulf. Its name and its features, notably an upright bow stem and transom stern, indicate its probable derivation from the British jolly boat. Other smaller craft, all single masted, occasionally found in Gulf or adjacent waters include the bedan, shuʿi, and zarook.

Dubai Dhow, never forget to cruise the creek when visiting Dubai! Photo by: Oyesan Dino Magkasi

Dhows were well adapted to Gulf waters because of their shallow draft and maneuverability. Their la-teen sails, long stems, and sharp bows equipped them well for running before the monsoon winds of the Indian Ocean, toward India in summer and toward Africa in winter. Wood for planking and masts was imported from the Malabar Coast of India or from East Africa.

Traditionally no nails were used; cord made from coconut husks was used to lash together the planks of the decks and gunwales. Photo:Oyesan Dino Magkasi

By the eighth century Arab fleets of such ships were part of a commercial maritime network not matched or superseded until the European circumnavigation of the globe.

Dubai Dhow. Photo:Oyesan Dino Magkasi

In the latter part of the eighteenth century, the Qawasim Emirate of the lower Gulf created a maritime empire that displaced earlier Omani dominance. Their power rested on the large fleets of dhows and the skill and ferocity of their crews. The attacks of these "pirates" on Anglo - Indian shipping brought Britain's naval intervention in the early nineteenth century and the eventual establishment of a trucial system under Britain's oversight. Photo:Oyesan Dino Magkasi

Until the 1930s hundreds of dhows made up the fleets that sailed over the pearling banks from June to September. Today a considerable number of commercial cargoes are carried in motorized dhows between Dubai, especially as a transshipment point, and Iran.

Dubai Dhow. Photo:Oyesan Dino Magkasi

Sailing in dhow, dining, singing, sightseeing tours are offered all year round in Dubai. Photo:Oyesan Dino Magkasi.

Some dhows are used for recreational purposes. Traditionally the Gulf’s most important manufacturing industry was the construction and outfitting of dhows. In the early twentieth century there were some 2,000 dhows in Bahrain alone, and 130 were built there yearly.

Dubai dhow. Photo:Oyesan Dino Magkasi

Small numbers continue to be built in Bahrain and elsewhere in the Gulf, still with the planks of the hull formed into a shell and the ribs then fitted to them.

Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/dhow#ixzz1PHDKK2cq